WRI Climate Data Now Available In Google Public Data Explorer

first_imgHow do per capita emissions compare across the U.S.? WRI is working with Google to make our data related to climate change more approachable and interactive than ever.Google’s Public Data Explorer is a new tool that makes large data sets easier to understand and explore. Users can reimagine data sets from a growing list of providers (like the U.S. Census, Eurostat, the World Bank, and, now, WRI’s Climate Analysis Indicators Tool – CAIT) as interactive charts and maps that illustrate data relationships and trends over time. These new data visualizations can be embedded in other websites and easily shared via email or social networks.Turning Environmental Data into Policy SolutionsAccessible data to support decision-making has always been WRI’s calling card. With CAIT, WRI provides a comprehensive and comparable database of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions data and other climate-relevant indicators. Its recently-updated CAIT-U.S. data set, which includes estimates of GHG emissions from all major economic sectors for each U.S. state, is now part of the Public Data Explorer.These data are important for answering policy-related questions regarding GHGs. As a first step towards implementing effective solutions to climate change, decision-makers need to know where GHG emissions come from and what drives them. For example:Which states constituted the top 10 emitters in 2007? New Ways to Visualize Greenhouse Gas EmissionsThe Google Public Data Explorer provides an opportunity to visualize answers to these and other questions in a way that is easy to see and understand. In some cases, the new Google platform also offers additional insights not available through CAIT, such as the moving time scale.By pairing CAIT data with Google’s tools, there are new possibilities for people everywhere to take part in using sound data to tell stories that frame environmental problems and solutions. In the future, we hope to include additional data sets that can tell even more stories through Google’s visualization tools.Suggestions for what you would like to see, or have a question about CAIT-U.S. data? Let us know here or join the conversation athttps://groups.google.com/group/climate-analysis-indicators-tool.center_img From which sectors do most greenhouse gas emissions originate in the United States?last_img read more

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3 Lessons for Better Supply Chain Management

first_imgThis post originally appeared on Forbes.com.What do three leading chemical, automobile, and software companies have in common? All three – Honda, BASF, and SAP – are looking to curb risks and take advantage of opportunities across their global supply chains. They’re doing so by measuring their greenhouse gas emissions—not just in their operations, but up and down their value chains.Many other multinationals are heading in the same direction. The Carbon Disclosure Project’s (CDP) annual survey of the Global 500, released last month, reveals that seven in ten respondents measured some value chain emissions in 2011, up from about half in 2010. (Note this figure is based on WRI’s analysis of the 405 companies that submitted data to the CDP 2012 survey data.)What’s driving the world’s biggest corporations down this path? In a nutshell: reputation, risk, and opportunity.First, business leaders are recognizing that companies’ global value chains are increasingly under scrutiny by consumers, the media, and most importantly, investors. A case in point is the unwelcome attention Apple has received for its association with its Chinese supplier, Foxconn. Retailers and corporate customers, too, are increasingly asking suppliers how they apply sustainability principles to the products they produce. Given the attention, corporations ignore supply chain risks—at their peril.Second, companies are increasingly aware of their exposure to environmental risks—such as climate change and water scarcity—through impacts on their suppliers. In particular, recent extreme weather events have put corporate leaders on alert. This summer’s record-breaking U.S. droughts have had ripple effects well beyond agriculture, including on the food and drink industry. Likewise, the 2011 floods in Thailand that shut down electronic components hit many Fortune 500 technology companies.Reflecting such real world threats, 81 percent of companies responding to the CDP survey said they faced physical risks from climate change. Thirty-seven percent went so far as to describe them as “a real and present danger.”Turning Risk into RewardOn the flip side, measuring value chain emissions can unearth hidden treasure in terms of efficiency and cost savings. Gaining an understanding of greenhouse gas hotspots in the value chain also help to focus efforts for product design improvements and reveal additional opportunities for innovation.Raw material suppliers often account for a large percentage of a company’s environmental footprint, especially in sectors such as retail and food and beverages. For example, Kraft Foods found that 70 percent of its greenhouse gas impact comes from its raw materials. Companies can deploy emission inventories to identify actions that help their suppliers save on energy and fuel use, leading to bottom-line benefits.This is the goal for first movers like BASF, SAP, and Honda. And it’s where the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Value Chain (Scope 3) Standard comes in. Launched a year ago by the World Resources Institute and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), the pioneering standard provides a step-by-step guide to measure and report value chain emissions.Lessons from Three CompaniesAfter applying the Scope 3 Standard, SAP is pursuing a three-point plan to cut emissions generated after it sells products to customers. The company is looking to design software that runs on fewer servers and requires less energy, work with hardware providers to increase equipment efficiency, and encourage customers to run data centers more efficiently. To this end, SAP has created new software products that run 60 percent more efficiently.BASF is taking a different tack . The chemical giant’s value chain assessment identified as an emissions hotspot the raw materials it purchases– responsible for more than double the volume of greenhouse gases than BASF’s own operations. The company is now collaborating with key raw material suppliers to identify emission-reduction solutions.Honda, meanwhile, announced in August that it had calculated the life-cycle emissions of the company’s operations and products, totaling 225 million tons of greenhouse gases in fiscal year 2012. The company learned that an eye-opening 87 percent of its emissions are generated by customer use of its motorcycles, cars, and power products, which will help inform its greenhouse gas reduction initiatives.Too Many LaggardsSuch examples of corporate leadership are heartening, but unfortunately, far too few companies have taken this step. Returning to the CDP survey, only eight of 405 companies measured most of their indirect emissions, such as purchasing raw materials and customer use and disposal of products. And the most common measure was business travel, which generally represents a very small portion of a company’s footprint.Bridging this gap between first movers and the rest of the Global 500 is critical to reduce the scope of business-related emissions that exacerbate climate change. We hope and expect that in the coming months, more companies will start to measure their full emissions picture—and reap the benefits of improved value chain measurement and management.last_img read more

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Equatorial Guinea Increases Protected Forests by 63 Percent, Shows New Atlas

first_imgLeer esta entrada del blog en españolLire ce blog post en FrançaisForests are the life blood of Equatorial Guinea. They cover roughly 98 percent of the total national land area, providing services and sustenance to hundreds of thousands of Equatoguineans. But despite the critical role of forests, the country lacked a comprehensive information system to support monitoring and responsible management of these ecosystems.Until now, that is. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) of Equatorial Guinea in partnership with WRI recently released the Interactive Forest Atlas of Equatorial Guinea Version 1.0, which tracks land use in the country over the past 15 years. As the first source of open data for the country’s forest sector, the Forest Atlas reveals some encouraging findings: Equatorial Guinea’s forest management has improved in recent years, with protected areas significantly increasing and forest concessions decreasing.The Interactive Forest Atlas of Equatorial Guinea Overlap Between Forest Concessions and Protected Areas Decreased: Areas where legally protected forest and concessions overlap significantly decreased over the past decade. Between 2002 and 2013, the total overlap area decreased from 129,816 hectares to 11,234 hectares, mostly due to the conversion of these overlapping areas into protected areas. These protected areas, when actively managed, help secure valuable forests for future generations.Foreign Companies Operate the Majority of Larger Forest Concessions: As of July 2013, there were 11 logging companies operating in 48 forest concessions in Equatorial Guinea. Companies from Malaysia, Lebanon, Korea, and China represented the largest shares, with Equatorial Guinea nationals positioned as higher-level partners, as required by the law. Only smaller logging permits are exclusively held by Equatorial Guinea nationals.Making Important Progress Toward Transparent DataA look into the Interactive Forest Atlas of Equatorial Guinea reveals that land officially allocated to logging decreased over the last 15 years—encouraging progress toward safeguarding forests for future generations. However, the production of the Forest Atlas itself is also a major step forward. The Forest Atlas is the first open data platform for Equatorial Guinea’s forest sector, representing a huge stride toward transparency, coordination, and access to information for all concerned actors.MAF and WRI plan to regularly update the Forest Atlas, as well as strengthen capacity-building to better apply this information and produce positive action on the ground. With transparent and consistently updated data, Equatorial Guinea can build on its progress and better manage its forests.LEARN MORE: Check out the full Forest Atlas, interactive mapping application, and poster. The Forest Atlas is a living information system combining the use of remote sensing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and ground-truthing to monitor and manage Equatorial Guinea’s forests. Through a combination of interactive mapping applications, data visualizations, analytical reports, training, and outreach, the Forest Atlas provides users with access to timely, accurate, and harmonized information on the state of Equatorial Guinea’s forests. The Forest Atlas displays the major official forest land use categories–forest concessions, protected areas, community forests, and forest plots–on one platform, including where these uses overlap. With a more complete picture of Equatorial Guinea’s forest sector, government officials and other decision-makers will be better equipped to foster responsible forest management.3 Major Findings from the Equatorial Guinea Forest AtlasThe first version of the Atlas encompasses 15 years of land use allocation data. The data reveals three major findings, some of which represent important progress when it comes to sustainable management of forests.Protected Areas Increased, while Forest Concessions Area Decreased: Between 1997 and 2013, the total area of protected areas increased by 392,023 hectares (63 percent), while forest concessions—those areas allocated for timber exploitation—decreased by 930,000 hectares (56 percent). Part of this change is due to the country’s recent oil boom, causing the economy to shift away from logging activities and subsistence forestry. But it also reflects official changes in policy – notably implementation of the 1997 Forest Law and 2000 Protected Area Law – that move forest management away from a timber-only focus, towards one that is more holistic and sustainable.Click on map to view larger version.center_img Congo Basin Forest AtlasesWith the addition of the Interactive Forest Atlas of Equatorial Guinea, WRI has now completed interactive forest atlases for all countries in Africa’s Congo Basin. View our other maps and resources below:Democratic Republic of the CongoCongoGabonCameroonCentral African Republiclast_img read more

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A Shared Vision for Thailand’s Solar Energy Development

first_imgElectricity Governance Initiative’s (EGI) 10 Questions to Ask about Scaling On-Grid Renewable Energy is a framework designed to facilitate multi-stakeholder engagement for improving renewable energy policy. The framework will be officially launched at WRI’s Washington, D.C. office on January 23rd, 2014.Learn more or sign up to attend the event here.Thailand is expected to become one of the leading solar PV markets in Southeast Asia. It was one of the first Asian countries to pursue renewable energy development, putting in place policy incentives back in 2006. This past summer, the country announced one of the more ambitious regional solar PV targets, seeking to develop 3,000 megawatts (MW) by 2021.Yet despite its ambitions, solar PV development has been a challenge in the country. Thailand’s generous Feed-in Tariff (FIT ) program, a policy designed to stimulate investment in renewable power through additional payments to renewable energy generators, resulted in a “solar gold rush” in 2008, leading to a number of speculative rather than realizable projects in the pipeline. Ultimately, the government shut the door to new solar projects in 2010. Experts criticize the country’s FIT program and the government’s weak regulatory framework for being inadequate at responding to changing market conditions, such as declining prices of solar PV modules. Others criticize the program for failing to consider potential impacts on consumers by expecting them to cover the additional payments.But there are signs of hope that Thailand’s solar power development is poised for a turnaround. The National Energy Policy Commission approved new solar policy plans this past year, including updated FIT rates that encourage local production by reserving 800MW for community-owned projects. And thanks in part to a new WRI tool, a multi-stakeholder group has emerged to ensure that Thailand’s solar power development proceeds in a way that is both inclusive and effective.Using WRI’s New 10 Questions to Ask FrameworkThe Electricity Governance Initiative’s (EGI) new tool, the 10 Questions to Ask About Scaling On-Grid Renewable Energy (10Qs about Scaling RE), is a framework that can be used to promote multi-stakeholder engagement to improve renewable energy policies and plans. Through an easy-to-follow, question-based guide, it aims to empower electricity sector stakeholders to have a voice in energy policy-making and implementation processes. It seeks to promote “good” electricity policies—those designed to ensure effectiveness of public expenditures, reduce unnecessary costs, raise the quality of electricity services, and minimize social and environmental impacts while seeking to reach specific policy objectives. It posits that “good” policies are rooted in good governance, and the framework integrates the governance principles of transparency, accountability, and participation in its design.The Chulalongkorn University’s Energy Research Institute, an EGI partner, tested the value of the 10Qs framework over the past year. Their experience illustrates how the framework can be used to ensure that renewable power development policy processes are robust and benefit all energy stakeholders.The Thai Solar PV Roadmap InitiativeIn 2012, experts from Chulalongkorn University’s Energy Research Institute convened stakeholders including Thai academics, civil society organizations, private sector representatives, and civil servants from institutions like the Ministry of Energy, Office of Regulatory Commission, and Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand. The meeting explored the potential of using the 10Qs about Scaling RE Framework to design a policy deliberation process for Thailand’s solar power development. Together, these stakeholders agreed to form the Thai Solar PV Roadmap Initiative (TSRI), an initiative that aims to provide the Thai government with recommendations on how to both effectively and inclusively pursue greater solar power development.The TSRI is now evaluating the policy landscape and undertaking focused research activities to better understand issues related to grid connection of distributed electric generation, solar PV business models, and permitting processes. Issues raised in the 10 Questions framework catalyzed this research agenda.Influential Thai NGOs, such as the Healthy Public Policy Foundation (HPPF), are also becoming involved in the Solar PV Roadmap project, convening civil society, community leaders, local governments, and media to discuss key issues that should be considered in the Roadmap. HPPF has been working with these stakeholders to conduct research on the development and use of solar energy at the local level, as well as to understand the costs and benefits associated with this type of generation. Pulling from these types of inputs and research, TSRI hopes to release a draft Solar PV Roadmap by March of 2014, which will provide a long-term strategy for solar energy development in Thailand.A Tool for Creating a Shared Vision for Energy DevelopmentEnergy stakeholders from utilities to government officials to consumers can learn from TSRI’s experience. The 10Qs serve as a critical tool for both engaging a variety of stakeholders and for examining how renewable energy policies impact all parties—particularly as the industry scales up. In that sense, it can serve as a planning framework that is both forward-looking and inclusive.LEARN MORE: The 10 Questions about Scaling On-Grid Renewable Energy Framework is the first in a series of energy policy-related frameworks. Stay tuned for the release of “10 Questions to Ask about Electricity Tariffs” and “10 Questions to Ask about Integrated Resources Planning”. For more information please contact Sorina Seeley or visit the Electricity Governance Initiative website.last_img read more

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COURT DATE SET FOR ARGOSY CASINO LAWSUIT VS MRHD

first_imgA trial date has been set next year for the lawsuit filed by the owner of the former Argosy Sioux City riverboat casino against its local partner.Penn National Gaming’s breach of contract action against Missouri River Historical Development is set to go to trial Feb. 12, 2018, in Des Moines.MRHD was the state-licensed nonprofit group that held the Argosy’s gambling license.The lawsuit says MRHD schemed to replace the Argosy with another operator even before their contract expired in July 2012.The Argosy closed in July 2014 after Iowa regulators denied its license renewal.MRHD had formed a partnership with developers who eventually opened the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in downtown Sioux City.APlast_img read more

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3 Key Plays – Arizona

first_imgI muted the sound for the sanity of my readers…There are like 5 outstanding blocks on this run. Randle was spectacular on Thursday for sure, but let’s not forget who paved the way for him…This is not something college juniors are supposed to do.One more after the jump… I got a text from Nolo about .00003 seconds after Blackmon caught this that said, “that throw was next level.” It was too, I almost feel like this play, at this level, is borderline cheating. Bonus points for the horrendous head fake Blackmon throws off the line because, well, it didn’t matter at all. Also, shout out to Carson Cunningham (who I did a podcast with) in the corner with a camera. Way to not get smoked by #81.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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The Importance of Jeremy Smith

first_imgNCAA Football: Oklahoma State at Texas A&MHere’s a stat for you:Jeremy Smith has played 25 football games for Oklahoma State in his career. 14 times he has rushed for more than 35 yards, 11 times he has not. In games when Smith rushes for more than 35 yards, OSU is 14-0, in games when Smith does not rush for more than 35 yards, OSU is a more pedestrian 8-3.The level to which Smith’s importance to this squad goes overlooked really astounds me. I’d go as far as to say that the fate of the Big 12 could res on the broad shoulder of #31 this season.That’s not to say the defense isn’t important. That’s not to say Wes Lunt isn’t important or that Joseph Randle is a throwaway. Obviously all of those pieces are vital to OSU’s success as a squad this season.But Smith does something none of those guys can do: he opens up the field on offense, he’s a nightmare for other teams. Todd Monken knows this,What makes Jeremy what he is is ‘I run downhill, I break tackles, I’m a one cut guy,’ You are what you are. That is what you are, be damn good at that.Just look what he did against Texas and OU last year: 17 carries for 259 yards and 4 TDs.In fact, here are your career rushing TD leaders against OU and Texas in the last 10 years.Smith – 6Hunter – 3Randle – 3Savage – 3Crosslin – 3Morency – 3Zac – 2Donovan – 2Bell – 2Toston – 1Pretty staggering considering he still has 240 minutes worth of football against those two squads[1. I can’t say this definitively because the box scores don’t go back far enough but I think it’s a safe assumption to say Smith is the all-time leader at OSU for rushing TDs against OU and Texas. Barry, Thurman, and Terry Miller didn’t play Texas and I don’t think any of them put up more than six against OU. They’re the only three guys with more career rushing TDs than Kendall Hunter]. The biggest problem Smith causes for other teams is a unintentional byproduct of the system Dana Holgorsen implemented two years ago. The essence of the air raid attack, the one OSU still uses, is to spread the defense to all edges of the field and get the ball to your fastest or best guys and let them do the work. You guys know this — you stretch the field, make it bigger, basically watch a Wisconsin-Illinois game and do the opposite of what they’re doing.What’s scary about OSU isn’t that they’ve been really good at that the last two seasons (though they have) but rather that one of their most valuable assets (Smith) keeps secondaries honest. He keeps them from shading towards Stewart or shifting towards Austin Hays. He makes linebackers think twice about picking up Randle on a little swing route because if said linebackers are wrong…well that’s 20 easy yards up the middle for Smith.He goes overlooked because he doesn’t fit the mold of what traditional air raid teams do. He’d be a star in the Big 10, lauded in the SEC for his power, and worshipped in the Big East (they don’t really do the whole offense thing). In the Big 12 though? He’s just the most important piece to one of the most curious title contenders in the last five years.That’s all.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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OSU Places Three Players on All-Big 12 First Team

first_imgStrange times these are. For an offense that’s traditionally (and by “traditionally” I mean “in the last 10 years”) been as potent as Mike Gundy’s, it hasn’t put a player on the All-Big first team offense in the preseason since 2013. Not that it’s been deserved. Still, it’s strange to think about.Especially when you juxtapose that with the fact that three Cowboys are on the All-Big 12 first team defense and one other (Chris Carson) snagged preseason Newcomer of the Year.Chris Carson has been named the Preseason Big 12 Newcomer of the Year, marking the 2nd consecutive year an OSU RB has earned this honor.— Kyle Boone (@PFBoone) July 15, 2015Here’s a look at the teams.1Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 3.09.02 PM2The even stranger thing is that there’s nobody on offense that sticks out as “yeah, that dude should have made it.” You can’t be conscionable and put any of the offensive line on there. Nobody even knows who’s going to start at running back. And the only wide receiver who would sniff a spot is Brandon Sheperd. Sorry, he’s not making it over cousin Sterling, Doctson or Coleman.Ogbah, Simmons and Peterson are all pretty obvious choices for the defensive side.The preseason picks will be revealed on Thursday, and I’ll look at what they mean (or what they’ve meant historically) for this upcoming season.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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Oklahoma State Has a Championship Mentality

first_imgOklahoma State has appropriately been tagged the Cardiac Cowboys, pushing several games this season to the limits and winning several in dramatic fashion. On a Halloween afternoon in Lubbock, things got weird early, but their response said everything you need to know about this team.The Cowboys trailed by 17 points on multiple occasions on Saturday, and their calm demeanor in the face of adversity allowed them to rally to a 70-53 victory on Saturday.“Never once did I see panic in my teammates eyes. We just gotta stay calm and execute,” Washington said in the postgame interview.“With the guys I play with, they know how to keep their composure and execute every time we step on the field.”That mentality is just flat out not normal. Under normal circumstances, a 17-point deficit is enough to make many teams crumble, or at least go into mild panic.But that calm mentality that is instilled in the players by the coaches and the staff is one that has consistently helped this team turn early game adversity into late game triumph time and time again.“Gundy always tells us never get down, stay calm, and keep doing what you’re supposed to do.” And that’s exactly what they did.That composed mentality has helped carry this team to several unlikely victories this season; and that very mentality is what could help boost this team to several more in November.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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Ream ready to be ‘next man up’ in U.S. defense

first_imgUnited States Tim Ream ready to be ‘the next man’ up in U.S. defense Ives Galarcep @soccerbyives Last updated 2 years ago 02:22 9/1/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Tim Ream USA United States United States v Costa Rica Honduras v United States Costa Rica Honduras WC Qualification CONCACAF The Fulham defender is a leading candidate to start in the U.S. defense against Costa Rica, taking another step in a career he never dreamed of having HARRISON, N.J. — Tim Ream was in familiar territory on Thursday, holding court at Red Bull Arena as the U.S. national team held its final training session ahead of Friday’s World Cup qualifier against Costa Rica.Ream began his professional career seven years ago on the same field where he stood Thursday. Back in 2010 he was a little-known rookie who few could have envisioned eventually making a multi-million dollar move to the English Premier League and becoming a regular on the USMNT. It is a road that has had its tough moments, but Ream can’t help but smile at the realization his career has already exceeded any expectations he may have had the first time he set foot in Red Bull Arena.”At the time [in college] if you had told me I’d be here with the national team and somewhat established I might have laughed in your face,” Ream said. “I don’t think I could have envisioned what my career has been and has become. It’s something that’s a lot of hard hours, a lot of long hours and a lot of sacrifices in areas that people who aren’t around professional sports don’t understand.” Article continues below Editors’ Picks Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Seven years later, Ream heads into Friday’s qualifier a leading candidate to start in central defense alongside Geoff Cameron. His most recent contribution to the national team, a steady showing against Mexico back in June, has made him the leading candidate to step in for injured starter John Brooks.”Personally, I want to be starting games, but we all know as a national team you may be the star and start for your club team and come in with your national team and temper expectations and take on a different role,” Ream said. “I think that’s the beauty of this team.”Right now I’m one of those ‘Next man up’ types and for me to be next man up and come in and show that you have the ability to help out the squad in any way that you can is something that right now I’m very well aware of and something I’ve embraced.”Tim Ream Fulham Championship 030717The Fulham defender has enjoyed a solid career in England, where he began with Bolton before the club’s relegation to the Championship. A move to Fulham two seasons ago has been a fruitful one for Ream, who has become a regular starter at a club with a rich tradition of American players. It is his play at Fulham that helped earn Ream a return to the national team picture after several years out of the mix. He was thrust into the national team setup in just his second season as a professional — after an impressive rookie season with the Red Bulls in 2010 — but struggles for both club and country plagued him during what should have been a breakout year.Those struggles didn’t keep him from making a move to Bolton, and even though it took him some time to re-establish himself with the national team, he has now become a regular call-up, becoming one of the team’s top left-footed center back options.Will Ream get the call on Friday against Costa Rica? He looks a good bet to be partnered with Geoff Cameron, but is also facing stiff competition from Omar Gonzalez and Matt Besler for the starting role.”I think Bruce has shown, even going back to the March friendlies, that’s there’s competition,” Ream said. “Even when [John Brooks] is in there’s competition. He’s not afraid to shuffle the pack and change things up, and choose pairings that he sees as the optimal pairing for that match depending on what the strikers are doing, or the team as a whole that we’re playing.”If Ream does get the start, he will be doing so in the stadium where his career began, a place that still brings him good vibes when he returns.”It’s still really home,” Ream said. “It was a place that gave me a chance to shine and prove myself on the professional level. There’s still a lot of people here that were here when I was, and that was five, five and a half years now. You don’t find that at a lot of clubs these days, so it’s nice to see some familiar faces and some old friends and it’s just nice to be back and see the things you used to see every day. It’s a little bit nostalgic really.”last_img read more

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Dembele expected to return in January

first_imgOusmane Dembélé Barcelona expect Dembele return in January after successful surgery Joe Wright Last updated 2 years ago 20:45 19/9/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(4) Ousmane Dembele Getafe Barcelona Getty Ousmane Dembélé Barcelona Getafe v Barcelona Primera División The France international was taken off early in his first La Liga start for Barcelona and will not be back until the turn of the year Barcelona expect Ousmane Dembele to return at the beginning of January following a successful operation on his hamstring.The France international suffered a torn tendon in the 2-1 La Liga win at Getafe and it was feared he could be out for up to four months.Barca 10/11 to win La Liga Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing However, after surgery in Finland, Barca now hope he will be back for close to the start of 2018.Ousmane Dembele BarcelonaIn a statement released on Tuesday, the club said: “First-team player Ousmane Dembele has been operated on successfully on the rupture to the tendon of the femoral biceps of his left thigh by Dr. Sakari Orava and under the supervision of Dr. Ricard Pruna.”The expected period of absence is three and a half months.”Barca president Josep Maria Bartomeu had expressed his optimism that their lower estimate on Dembele’s length of absence would prove correct.”I have spoken with him, he’s affected, but that’s normal,” he told TVE. “He told me he knows everything will be okay, though, and that he’s in good hands. By Wednesday or Thursday, he will be back in Barcelona.”He could return in January, I hope so because that would represent a nice present for all Barcelona fans on Three Kings Day [January 6].”last_img read more

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Barca team news vs Malaga

first_imgPrimera División Barcelona Team News: Injuries, suspensions and line-up vs Malaga Ben Hayward Last updated 2 years ago 21:24 10/20/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(2) Paulinho Gerard Deulofeu Barcelona Alex Caparros Primera División Barcelona Barcelona v Málaga Málaga Everything you need to know ahead of the Catalans’ league game at home to the struggling Andalusians on Saturday… Barcelona face Malaga at Camp Nou on Saturday as top meets bottom in the ninth round of La Liga.The Blaugrana lost their 100 per cent record in the Primera Division last weekend as they drew 1-1 away to Atletico Madrid at the Wanda Metropolitano, but the Catalans are four points clear of second-placed Valencia and five ahead of Real Madrid after eight games.Barca beat Olympiacos 3-1 in the Champions League on Wednesday night, meaning Ernesto Valverde’s side have picked up maximum points from their three European games so far this season as well. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Here, Goal looks at everything you need to know as the Catalans return to Liga action on Saturday…BARCELONA INJURIESOusmane Dembele is still sidelined with a thigh injury and is unlikely to feature again in 2017. Rafinha is also out for Barcelona, with Arda Turan and Jordi Alba both doubtful for the game against Malaga.Ousmane Dembele Getafe BarcelonaBARCELONA SUSPENSIONS Gerard Pique was sent off for two bookable offences in the Champions League on Wednesday night, but Barcelona do not have any players suspended in La Liga.Gerard Pique BarcelonaBARCELONA POTENTIAL STARTING LINE-UPJordi Alba has a minor injury and faces a battle to be fit for the game against Malaga. If the Spain left-back does not make it, Lucas Digne, who scored a fine goal against Olympiacos on Wednesday, will start again.Nelson Semedo is expected to return at right-back, while Pique will start in central defence as his red card on Wednesday came in the Champions League.Gerard Deulofeu could keep his place in attack after impressing for the first 45 minutes against Olympiacos, before making way at half-time due to Pique’s dismissal.Deulefeu 6/4 to score anytimeBarcelona possible MalagaMALAGA TEAM NEWS Malaga coach Michel is under increasing pressure after picking up just one point from eight games so far this season in La Liga.The Andalusians have lost to Eibar, Girona, Las Palmas, Atletico, Valencia, Sevilla and Leganes in the Primera Division, earning their only point in a 3-3 draw with Athletic Club.Diego Gonzalez and Zdravko Kuzmanovic miss out through injury, while Recio is suspended. Roberto Jimenez and Juan Carlos Perez are doubtful.Michel Malaga Barcelona La LigaBEST OPTA MATCH FACTS Malaga were the only team Barcelona failed to win against in La Liga last season (drawing at home and losing away to the Andalusians). Barcelona have won their last 16 games at home in La Liga, the longest current run of any team in the competition. After scoring 10 goals in his first 10 games against Malaga in La Liga, Lionel Messi netted only one in the sides’ next six meetings and that was at La Rosaleda, in January 2016. Ernesto Valverde has only lost four of his 14 meetings as manager with Malaga in La Liga, all four with Athletic Club. Michel has lost six of his seven managerial games against Barca in the top flight. His only win was last season at La Rosaleda (2-0). TV COVERAGE & KICK-OFF TIME Barcelona versus Malaga kicks off at 20:45 local time at Camp Nou on Saturday and will be broadcast live from 19:40 UK time on Sky Sports Football.last_img read more

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Saracens’ stroll to victory over Sale marred by Billy Vunipola injury

first_imgIt is innocuous afternoons such as this – a routine maximum haul at home for the European champions – that can inflict the most damage. Billy Vunipola left the field just before half-time in evident pain, unable to put any pressure on his right knee. With England due to gather in Oxford on Sunday for a three-day camp in advance of the November internationals, the timing is particularly unfortunate, for player, club and country. And all this after a return last week from the injury that had cost him his place on the Lions tour. Early indications, too, were that he was back in fine fettle.Vunipola went down just before the break, his knee caught in an awkward position as he helped his team-mates defend a maul on their tryline. Saracens saw off the threat without too much trouble, gradually forcing Sale back with each collision until Juan Figallo won a relieving penalty, but then the true extent of the damage became apparent, Vunipola clearly in much distress and helped off the field after a few minutes’ treatment. Share via Email Carl Hogg questions Wayne Barnes as Worcester lose to Gloucester match reports Share on WhatsApp Saracens … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Messenger Before we had entered the 10th Saracens had another, this time Williams finishing, for his first try in Saracens colours, when Spencer went blind from an attacking lineout. And so we settled down for the anticipated rout.But that was it as far as first-half tries went. The theory that precocious, cocky scrum-halfs (is there any other kind?) make excellent fly-halfs was given weight as De Klerk popped up in all manner of awkward positions, probing here with pace, here with a kick, until one such intervention coaxed Marcelo Bosch into a high tackle. De Klerk dusted himself off to land the penalty, just before the half-hour, but Owen Farrell landed one of his own in reply a few minutes later as Saracens resumed their siege, which Sale’s defence were starting to handle with greater authority than they had at the start. Rugby union Read more The Observer Share on Twitter “We don’t know how bad it is yet,” said Mark McCall, Saracens’ director of rugby, of this latest setback. “He’s off getting a scan now. We pray and hope it’s not as bad as it looks. It’s cruel luck, and we obviously feel for him terribly.”Otherwise this was a pain-free assignment for Saracens, returning from their Stateside jaunt without missing so much as a beat. They burst into the game, then bade their time before burying Sale in the second half.The Sharks’ problems started even before the game had. Their fly-half, AJ MacGinty, the one player they did not have a like-for-like replacement for, fell ill, so Faf de Klerk moved out a step to 10, with Will Cliff brought in to play scrum-half. Not that Saracens were unaffected by disruption themselves. Even before Vunipola’s withdrawal, their back row had suffered. Mike Rhodes’s shoulder, on which he had an operation this summer, continues to cause him strife and Saracens do not expect to see him back for 12 weeks. With him unavailable Maro Itoje moved to the blindside and the rising youngster Nick Isiekwe, capped in Argentina, stepped into the engine room.It was fairly obvious, even before the exhibition to follow, that Saracens’ resources were better able to handle their disruption than Sale’s theirs.Sale were on the back foot from the off. The Vunipola boys were looking in good nick, Billy loosening up with some hefty early carries, and the pianists behind were in tune, Alex Goode releasing Liam Williams for a run down the left before Ben Spencer dummied and waltzed clean through the fringes of a ruck for the game’s first try – in the fourth minute. Premiership Topicscenter_img Support The Guardian Read more Sale Marcus Smith shines for Harlequins but Leicester Tigers turn the tide Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Since you’re here… Saracens did not let up in the second half. A Farrell penalty extended the lead, before an imperious break from the same man between two dumbstruck front-five forwards set up Spencer for his second try, any lingering doubt about the result comprehensively crushed with a little under half an hour still to run.Then followed the bonus-point try, barely 10 minutes later. Josh Charnley had spilled the ball in the tackle of Sean Maitland, after a scything incursion from the blindside, to cost Sale their first obvious chance of a try, but Saracens resumed normal service, wave after wave of muscular runners from every angle, until Schalk Brits’s inside ball put Vincent Koch over for their fourth.Sale, though, are nothing if not pacy. Charnley may have missed the one clear chance of the first hour, but two tries for Byron McGuigan in the final quarter gave them something at least, both taken with some aplomb in the corner.In between them, though, Nathan Earle finished Saracens’ fifth, worked into the corner with rather more margin for error. There was nothing tight about the game, either – but it may yet take its toll all the same. Twitter Share on LinkedIn Facebook Pinterest Byron McGuigan scores Sale’s second try despite the efforts of Henry Taylor. Photograph: Henry Browne/Getty Images Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Mick Fanning bows out but insists: ‘I’m always going to be surfing’

first_imgSurfer Mick Fanning fights off shark attack at J-Bay Open Since you’re here… Support The Guardian Australia sport Twitter I’m just a determined little bugger. I was always that kid that wanted to go and be better Reuse this content features Share on LinkedIn I got out of the water and it was almost like going to your own wake. There was a lot of laughter, a lot of crying Facebook “I’m just a determined little bugger,” he says. “I was always that kid who wanted to go and be better. From soccer to running, I was just always doing the extras in the backyard or whatever. When it came to surfing I always felt like I had to do more. Growing up through juniors I was always second or third, fourth, never winning events, and that determination to beat those guys was pretty much the driving force behind it all.”In 2004, he encountered a foe like no other he had experienced. This time it wasn’t a rival athlete or a marine beast, as he would later meet, but a horror injury that threatened to get the better of him – and put an end to a career that was really only just starting. The term “horror” is not used lightly here; Fanning tore his hamstring clean off the pelvic bone while surfing at Indonesia’s Mentawai island chain, severing the ligaments that attach the muscle to his buttocks. His description to Surfer magazine of the operation that followed is wince-inducing.He was out of action for six months, but it was actually the time away from the water and laid up on the couch that allowed him to reflect on his career to that point. Rather than allowing the injury to beat him, he used it as a platform upon which he could build and, while watching old video footage of himself surfing in a heat from years previous, he was struck with a moment that would change the direction of his career.“I was just looking at myself and I realised I wasn’t prepared,” he says. “I felt this guilt came over me and I never wanted to feel like that again. And that was the start of it all. I kept carrying that out throughout my career and now I feel like if I’m not giving 100% I’m trying to create a myth really.” This realisation would eventually tell him it was the right moment to call time on his career. “It was pretty much a no-brainer. I knew, as soon as I felt it, what was going on.”Fittingly, and entirely by design, the bell will finally toll for him at the venue that first launched his professional career: Bells Beach. His victory over his idol Danny Wills at the iconic Victorian stop in 2001 paved the way for his inclusion on the Tour a year later. But if that win catapulted him into the spotlight, it was not a position Fanning would ever come to feel comfortable with. He has never been one to chase the limelight, and now says he’d be “happy to disappear and never have another media article about me again”. Share on Facebook Share on WhatsApp Mick Fanning has achieved pretty much everything in surfing. He’s rebounded from a gruesome, career-threatening injury to win three world titles, completed 16 World Tour seasons, travelled the globe, surfed under the Northern Lights and been honoured with an Order of Australia by the Queen for his contribution to the sport. And punched a sizeable shark on the nose live on TV.So perhaps it is little surprise to hear the 36-year-old has no regrets whatsoever when reflecting upon an eventful professional career, which will soon come to an end. “I’ve achieved more than I ever dreamed of,” he tells Guardian Australia after announcing he will farewell the pro circuit at Bells Beach next month. “As a kid, you dream of becoming world champion, but to get there is such a different reality. I’ve done things I would never have dreamed of. If I felt like I was regretting something, I would have addressed it at that time and tried to change things.” Share via Email ‘Mick, I owe you a beer’: British surfer thanks Fanning after fending off shark Read more A young Fanning celebrates defeating Danny Wills in the final at Bells Beach in 2001. Photograph: Adam Pretty/Getty Images Play VideoAdvertisementPlayCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%FullscreenMuteEmbedThis is a modal window.Embed code Facebook Like it or not, avoiding the media’s attention throughout as successful career as his is nigh on impossible. Such is the lot of a world-beating athlete. And of course there is also the small matter of that encounter with a suspected great white shark at Jeffrey’s Bay during his annus horribilis in 2015, which made headlines around the world and brought a new level of media interest to Fanning’s front door. “To be totally honest, I didn’t know how big the story was when it all went down,” he says. “I got out of the water and it was almost like going to your own wake. There was a lot of laughter, a lot of crying. Coming off the plane and going straight into live media across every channel … holy shit. Having news channels outside the front of my house was next level. Mick Fanning Twitter It has been a long personal and professional journey for the self-proclaimed “annoying little kid” who tagged along with his brothers to the beach, after moving from Penrith to Coffs Harbour at the age of five, and took his first tentative steps on the path to becoming a global star of his sport. As with many sporting stories though, the ride has not been entirely smooth, and amid the many highlights there have been setbacks to overcome. Most poignantly, he has had to twice deal with tragedy. In 1998, when Fanning was just 17, his brother Sean was killed in a car accident, and then, in 2015, his eldest brother Peter died in his sleep while Fanning was in competition at Hawaii’s Pipe Masters and in contention for a fourth world crown. Peter’s death was a contributing factor to Fanning taking a half-year sabbatical in 2016.“I guess a lot of people face adversity,” he reflects. “It’s just a matter of where you put that energy. For me, the best place to use that energy was in the water. The water is also such a healing place for me. Whatever happens, happens, and you deal with it when it comes to you. I just tried to use that energy, whether it was good or bad, in my surfing, and use it the best way I knew how, which was on a surfboard.”Fanning has been thrilling crowds on the World Tour since 2002, the year after he won his first title at Bells Beach as a wildcard entrant, but of course behind the end product – the tricks, the trophies, the celebrations, the glory – there is so much more to being a champion. Hard work, dedication and a deep-seated desire to keep pushing, no matter the obstacles in the way, are just as key as raw talent, and Fanning is happy to acknowledge the role played by a grittiness he has carried with him since an early age. Topics Pinterest Share on Pinterest Share on Messenger … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Pinterest With retirement looming, Fanning is preparing to turn his focus to a range of charitable and conservation projects, as well as his business ventures. He’ll also have the time to spend with friends and family and enjoy the “everyday living of being a good friend and brother”. But he will not, and cannot, stop surfing. It’s in his DNA. He is intrigued by different boards and says retirement from the pro circuit will allow him to surf however he feels, instead of within the confines of competition criteria. “I’m always going to be surfing. Hopefully I can surf until the day I die,” he says. “The ocean gives you so much. I’ve had an amazing career until this stage, but now I’m just changing the channel a little.” “It definitely took some time to work through those emotions and all that sort of stuff. I feel like I’ve dealt with it now and I feel like I’ve moved on.” Share on Twitter Surfinglast_img read more

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Karren Brady: ‘I’ve never walked away from anything – and I’m not going to start now’

first_img Brady with David Sullivan, 1993. Photograph: Getty Images Karren Brady is immaculate – navy dress, navy tights, navy shoes and Chanel belt, her hair perfectly coiffed, exuding warmth and confidence. She directs me to her equally immaculate office at West Ham United, the football club where she is the vice-chairman. Brady sits behind the desk, a Warholesque print of West Ham legend Bobby Moore above her, a laptop in front, and a huge flatscreen TV with rolling news on the wall. Her world seems perfectly composed. You would never guess Brady’s football club is in meltdown and fans are calling for her head.At 48, and a quarter of a century after becoming Birmingham City’s CEO, she is still known as “the first lady of football”. But, of course, there is much more to Brady than football – numerous business interests (last July, she became chair of Philip Green’s Taveta retail empire); her position as a Tory peer in the House of Lords; an outspoken column for the Sun; aide to Lord Sugar on The Apprentice; mother of two grown children; and champion of women in the workplace. It is in this last capacity that we meet.Brady has just made a timely TV programme about the gender pay gap. She examines the nature of unconscious bias (how primary schoolchildren distinguish between women’s jobs and men’s jobs, and how employers tend to choose men over women even when they have the same CVs), why women are often paid less for work of equal value, why women can’t ask for more money but men can, and, perhaps most importantly, how working mothers are discriminated against.Before we start, Brady reaches for her iPhone. “Can I send my daughter a text? She wants me to give her a call. I think she’s had a promotion at work.” She taps away at supersonic speed, then looks up. “Right. So. Have you seen the programme? What did you think of it?”She reminds me of Max Clifford, another supreme self-brander. Clifford would always start interviews by “receiving” phone calls from, say, Simon Cowell or Beyoncé, thanking him for everything he had done for them. Brady’s narrative is different – this is the woman who has everything: brilliant businesswoman, TV star and supermum. She glances at her huge gold watch. I sense the timer is running. The G2 interview Brady with Alan Sugar and Nick Hewer on the Young Apprentice, 2010. Photograph: BBC/TALKBACK THAMES/TALKBACK THAMES Facebook It’s no surprise she has made this programme. After all, on The Apprentice she often pulls up contestants for throwaway sexist remarks, or signals her disapproval with a killer arched eyebrow. What makes her career so fascinating is that, at the same time as championing women’s rights, she has been associated most closely with some of industry’s great unreconstructed dinosaurs – Sugar, Green and the former pornographer David Sullivan, owner of Birmingham City and now West Ham.The programme is a powerful exploration of gender inequality at work, and makes me wonder how she challenges some of the male attitudes she comes across in the boardroom.One of her missions in the documentary is to teach women how to ask for a pay rise – she tells viewers she only agreed to appear on The Apprentice so long as nobody was paid more than her. It’s amazing you get paid as much as Sugar, I say, seeing as it’s basically his show. She looks embarrassed. “No, no. I think that came across completely wrong. I did point that out to the makers, actually. Alan is obviously the main person on the show. I meant the roles that are equal to mine – I wouldn’t accept being paid less.”There’s similar public confusion over her personal wealth, which has been estimated at £85m. “That’s complete rubbish, I’m not worth anything like that,” she says. “That’s Wikipedia. There’s not much I can do about that.” But the beauty of Wikipedia is that you can ask for information to be corrected. features I look at the Bobby Moore painting above her head. It must be a pretty awful time at West Ham – the threat of relegation, the lack of quality transfers, widespread unhappiness with their new ground in what was the 2012 London Olympics stadium (Brady negotiated a bargain rent of £2.5m a year, but fans have complained it was not built for football). There is unhappiness, too, with the manager David Moyes and, perhaps most of all, with the three people at the top of the club – owners Sullivan and Gold, and Brady, whose annual salary is £868,000.Earlier this month, there was a violent pitch invasion and coins were thrown at the directors’ box. What was even more shaming was that the match marked the 25th anniversary of Moore’s death, and was supposed to celebrate the club icon.It must have been horrifying, I say. “I don’t want to talk about West Ham,” says Brady, “because this [the TV show] is something that is really important to me, and I don’t want to cloud the two issues. This is something I’ve done on my Sundays and days off to shine a light on the equality issues for women and I would like to focus on that.”But, I say, the subjects are not unrelated. Some of the attacks target you particularly as a woman. “I disagree. I’ve never heard anybody shout at me. I obviously get social media comments, but I think everybody does in the public eye and you just have to live with that. A lot of the aggression has been channelled at the two chairmen, the two owners.”She looks at her laptop, and says it is time for her to get on with the rest of her day. Shortly before selling Birmingham City, Sullivan said he had lost the support of the fans and when that happens it is time to walk away. Has that time not come at West Ham? “I’ve never walked away from anything I’ve done, and I’m not going to start now. I genuinely believe the move we made to the stadium is the right one. That’s why we had 52,000 season ticket holders, and why 90% of those renewed.” Again, she says, we are not here to talk about West Ham. I say I have one more question related to women at work.Last year, after a post-match interview, the then Sunderland manager Moyes told BBC reporter Vicki Sparks that she “might get a slap, even though you’re a woman” because she was being “a wee bit naughty”. Moyes was fined £30,000 by the FA. In her column in the Sun, Brady wrote: “Hopefully the penny has dropped for him that it’s not OK to patronise, intimidate and threaten women and treat them as if they are impostors in a man’s world. End. Of.” Seven months later he was appointed West Ham manager. I can’t begin to understand how she agreed to hiring him.Did you have no qualms, I begin to say. She cuts me off. “I know what you’re going to say. Can we just concentrate on the programme.” Let me at least ask the question, I say. Again, she cuts me off. “I’ve already made a comment about that, and I don’t want to go there. If you want to talk about the programme, I’m really, really happy to, but I really don’t feel this is an interview about West Ham or talking about my manager or talking about the troubles my chairmen face. I’ve agreed to see you today because it’s a serious issue.” But this issue is about just that – treating women equally at work. “So far you’ve used this programme to attack my chairmen, to attack Lord Sugar, attack David Moyes,” she says.I’m not attacking them, I say. I’m just asking how you hold men with clout to account when they treat women unfairly. “Whatever …” she mutters. The smile has gone. Suddenly the room feels very cold. I change the subject. But wherever I head we run into trouble. In the documentary, she bemoans the lack of legislation to ensure women are paid equally for doing jobs of equal worth. I ask what she plans to do about this as a peer. “Well, obviously in the Lords we review legislation so all we can do is keep campaigning for these issues to be pushed higher and higher up the agenda. But I don’t really have any political activities.” How can you say that when you’re a Tory peer? She doesn’t answer.So we return to the safe territory of Brady’s brilliant career. Yes, she says, she is proud of herself. “When I left school at 18 with no qualifications,” – she seems to have forgotten her nine O-levels and four A-levels – “I didn’t really know what I was going to do with my life. I’ve taken every opportunity, pushed myself in ways I’m not sure I knew were even possible, I’ve made the best of my life and career. So yes, I do feel proud of myself.”Despite her inconsistencies and selective memory, Brady should be proud of herself. Hers is a remarkable story. She has let nothing hold her back, not even a life-threatening brain aneurysm in 2006. She says this simply made her realise how short life is, and redouble her efforts. She looks at the time again.What ambitions are still unfulfilled? “I don’t know. The toughest thing about being a success is you’ve got to keep on being a success. You have to do the things you’re passionate about, that you love. Who the hell wants to get to 48 and think: ‘I wish I would have, I should have … I could have done this, I might have done that.’ You don’t really do much in life unless you take risks, push yourself and find your passion.”At times, it is hard to know what Brady’s passion is. She doesn’t seem mad about football, despite running two clubs for half her life; nor about politics, despite being a Conservative peer. But there is undeniably passion. You can see it in her face, her drive, her hunger to achieve. It’s passion for family, for business, for leading from the front, for being Karren Brady.I get up to go. She is thinking about the future – what’s left to conquer. “I’m not looking to be a Cabinet minister. I don’t want to be an MP, I don’t want to be mayor of London.” Why not mayor? “Because at the moment I have too much on.” She pauses. There’s a twinkle in her eye, and the warmth has returned. “Maybe that’s an ambition for the future,” she says.Why Do Men Earn More Than Women? is at 10pm on 4 April, Channel 5 Twitter Brady in the House of Lords, 2014. Photograph: PA David Moyes. Photograph: Joe Toth/BPI/REX/Shutterstock In the documentary, Brady is constantly left “open-mouthed” or “speechless” at her discoveries. For example, she says that even though it’s illegal to ask women in an interview if they have children, 46% of employers think this is fine, and 41% think working mothers are a burden on the team. It’s strange she was shocked by this finding. After all, Sugar famously said that if he couldn’t ask women whether they had children, the solution was not to hire them. Has she challenged him on this? She looks surprised. “Well, I have never heard the quote you’ve just put to me, so I’ve never tackled him about it. I don’t know if you’ve ever worked in business, but you don’t go around going raaaah [she roars], having these massive confrontations.” In 2010, I say, you were was asked about his comment in the Guardian. “God, I don’t remember!” she says. “Putting him to one side, my view is that the inference, by asking, is that those women are not as dedicated or hardworking or ambitious. I know myself, from being a working woman, that is not the case.”Brady grew up in Edmonton, north London. Her Irish father Terry was a self-made, Rolls-Royce driving millionaire, who made his fortune in property and printing. Her Italian mother, Rita, was a full-time mum. She was sent to an all-girls Catholic boarding school, which she hated. “You do what you’re told, you wear what you’re told, you eat what you’re told, you go to bed when you’re told.” It made her ambitious for a different life, she says. “I was sick of being told what to do. The one thing I wanted was independence. And I realised to have that independence, you needed financial independence.” After passing nine O-levels, she left to join the sixth form of a former all-boys school – one of only six girls. She left with four A-levels, but decided she wanted to make money rather than go to university. She joined Saatchi & Saatchi at 18, then went to work for LBC, where she targeted her father’s client, David Sullivan, to advertise with the radio station.He placed £2m worth of advertising with LBC. Before long, Sullivan headhunted her, bought Birmingham City at her instigation, and, when she was 23, made her CEO. Sullivan bought the club for £700,000 in 1993, and sold it in 2009 for £82m. Much of Brady’s wealth is thought to date back to the sale of the club. By the time she left, 75% of senior management were women. Twitter Twitter Pinterest Sullivan and Brady remain umbilically tied. In 2010, he bought West Ham United (with former Birmingham co-owner David Gold). Again, Brady was given the job of running the commercial side of the club – though her title was now vice-chairman rather than CEO.The stories of sexism she has faced in football are legion. At her first game as CEO she asked directions to the boardroom and was told “directors’ wives go this way”. When opposition fans chanted “Karren Brady is a whore”, she had to tell her grandmother they were singing “Karren Brady is 24”. Then there is the story of the player who said to her: “I can see your tits in that top.” She is said to have replied: “Well, don’t worry – when I sell you to Crewe, you won’t be able to see them from there.” Is that true? She smiles. “Yeah. Three days later when I sold him, it was the best deal I ever did.” Who was the player? “I can’t tell you. Only because he happens to be a friend of my husband, and he is so embarrassed about what he did that I’ve promised I would never reveal who it was.” She also sold her husband, former footballer Paul Peschisolido, twice, making a profit on him both times. She is at her best telling these stories – funny, lively, a natural performer.I wonder if she’s ever torn a strip off Sullivan over his views on women. What did she say, for example, when she discovered that he had been a patron of the Presidents Club – the men-only charitable trust that held galas where businessmen were recently caught groping female hostesses who had been asked, in advance, to sign non-disclosure agreements?She looks aghast. “I don’t think he was a patron,” she says. “Absolutely not. No, absolutely not. He attended many, many years ago, but he didn’t like it and never went again.” Are you sure? “100%.” She asked him? “No, he just mentioned it in passing.”She answers with such conviction that I assume I have got it wrong. But later I check the Presidents Club brochure that emerged after the event. Sure enough, Sullivan is named as a patron. Although it is true he did not attend this year’s gala, his son Jack – managing director of West Ham Ladies – did.In the documentary, Brady says the most difficult obstacle facing women at work is returning after maternity leave. After the birth of her first child, she took only three days’ leave. Although many women regard her as a fantastic role model, some would say she succeeded not by championing women’s rights and needs but by hurdling them. Did she feel she had to “man-up” to stand a chance? “It’s not language that I would use. I just felt this overwhelming sense of responsibility that I had to be there, and I couldn’t let people down and I had to bring up a child. And it just manifested itelf in very little maternity leave. It’s something I deeply regret. It’s not something I would ever encourage.”A few years ago she said she would never take a year’s maternity leave – the amount women are legally entitled to – and that “There would be no CEO, I think, that would take a year off.” Have her views changed since then? “No, because I could not take a year off. I wish I’d taken more time than I did, but not a year.” Does she still believe that no CEO would ever take a year off? She insists she does not remember saying that, and that it is up to the individual. Share on LinkedIn Pinterest Share on WhatsAppcenter_img Pinterest Reuse this content Share on Twitter Karren Brady Share on Pinterest Television Pinterest Facebook Twitter The Apprentice Topics Facebook Share via Email West Ham United Share on Facebook Share on Messenger Facebook last_img read more

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‘We’re just trying to survive it’: Russian cities brace for World Cup

first_img Twitter Share on WhatsApp Fifa’s president Gianni Infantino with Russian Vladimir Putin. Photograph: Felipe Trueba/EPA Twitter Facebook On a riverboat between the World Cup cities of Kazan and Samara last month, a Russian couple in their 50s asked earnestly whether “all these rumours” about Moscow’s poisoning of Sergei Skripal could lead the west to boycott or cancel the tournament.“Russians don’t surrender to pressure like that, we push back hard,” said Yevgeny Prigov, a hefty businessman who trades in machine parts, echoing a popular Russian cliche.Their belief, summarised, was that the west wants to see Russia fall on its face when it hosts the World Cup this month, and that Russia would pull it off in spite of its guests.It’s a bit like inviting your enemies over for dinner: the best revenge is a five-star meal.“This is supposed to be a prazdnik,” or celebration, said his wife, Maria, sipping a lager. “And that’s what we’re going to give them.”For the defiant World Cup hosts, this month’s celebration of football comes amid its worst relations with the west since the cold war, after the annexation of Crimea, accusations of interfering in US elections, and the recent nerve agent attack in Salisbury. ‘Much nicer than expected’: World Cup fans size up modern Moscow Robbie Williams to perform at World Cup opening ceremony On national television last week, Putin said that the main reason he had not sacked Vitaly Mutko, the disgraced former sports minister, was because the west wanted him out.“We know what kind of attack was made against him in connection with the doping scandal,” Putin said. “Under those kinds of circumstances, it is not possible to have him retire.”The main intrigue of Russia’s World Cup will likely be how Russia’s regional cities cope with the influx of tens of thousands of fans, many of them seeing foreign tourists on this scale for the first time in their history. Security will be extreme.The rule with prazdniki is that they mustn’t be spoiled, not by protests, provocations, faulty planning or poor security.“The best [Putin] can do in terms of soft power is to properly organise the championship without unpleasant episodes, especially in the security sphere, and get some pure pleasure from sports,” said Kolesnikov. World Cup fever, gay rights abuses and war crimes – it’s an ugly mix Share on Twitter Mohamed Salah poses with the Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov in Grozny. Photograph: Karim Jaafar/AFP/Getty Images Read more news Pinterest World Cup 2018 Peter Tatchell Regionally, it’s a moment for leaders across Russia to preen. Down in Chechnya, Ramzan Kadyrov has already secured his photo op with Mo Salah, the world’s most famous Muslim footballer, as he leverages the World Cup in his push to be Putin’s envoy to the Middle East. Kadyrov reportedly had the Liverpool star summoned from his hotel, where he was asleep, for the meet-and-greet on the Grozny pitch.In regions across Russia, local officials have gladly taken the money offered for new stadiums and urban development, while also gritting their teeth for the daunting prospect of ensuring an incident-free tournament.“Where are you from?” growled the governor of Volgograd, a veteran of the first Chechen war, when I asked him about fan safety ahead of last month’s Russian Cup finals between FC Tosno and FC Avangard Kursk. “I assure you we are taking every possible precaution to ensure their safety.”It wasn’t an overstatement. The city has closed streets and shut public transport for several kilometres around the stadium during games. The security measures and other preparations are so extensive that match days have been declared public holidays because no one can get to work. World Cup Read morecenter_img Residents in one apartment block in Yekaterinburg have been told not to use their balconies, open their windows or stand near their windows on match days, in case they’re mistaken for attackers and shot by police snipers, Reuters reported.“To be honest we’re just trying to survive it,” Olga Khavanskaya, a schoolteacher, told me in Volgograd during the city’s Victory Day parade. “There’s this feeling like the city has been ripped up from the ground and flipped over. The city looks better than I can ever recall … but I’m ready for it all to be over.” Even the hooligans are under lock and key. “We’ve pretty much been sidelined,” Kostya, a member of a CSKA firm, told me in a Moscow pub recently. It’s a tightrope walk, a vast balancing act across 11 cities, and your greatest rivals have front-row seats. Perhaps deep down, the Kremlin may still hope that a successful tournament will earn recognition. But the real concern is not screwing up. So don’t ruin the prazdnik. There was a time when Russia saw prestige sporting competitions like the World Cup or the Olympics as an occasion to woo the west and seek acceptance into a club of great nations. Russia still paid lip service to detente when it was awarded the tournament in 2010, and championed a reset with the US under its liberal-ish president Dmitry Medvedev.But forget about rehabilitating Vladimir Putin through sport now.“Russia is so toxic that the Mundial [World Cup] can’t help Putin to change anything, including his image,” said Andrei Kolesnikov, a political analyst and senior fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Centre. Not that anyone here much cares. Defiance to the west has been enshrined in public policy and the national media since Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea, with officials wearing western sanctions as a badge of respect. Facebook Share on Pinterest Russia Vladimir Putin Share on Facebook Sergei Skripal Share on LinkedIn Share via Email Topics Reuse this content Ramzan Kadyrov Russian officials still bristle when they recall gleeful foreign coverage of a “double toilet”, two commodes in a single stall, at the Biathlon centre ahead of the 2014 Sochi Olympics. To the west, it was a symbol of slapdash planning or official corruption. To Russia, it was a construction mistake blown out of proportion.A person close to the Kremlin said that the Russian leader played up the geopolitical nature of the Olympics to justify the criticism over massive expenditures, a reported $50bn, to remake the Black Sea city of Sochi.“There were a lot of questions about why it was costing so much, so he came out and said it’s about promoting Russian values and developed a narrative behind it,” the person said.By contrast, the World Cup, costing an estimated $14bn across 11 cities according to the respected RBC business daily, has kicked up less fuss. Among the reasons? The country’s main opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, who publicises reports on official corruption, was sentenced to 30 days in jail last month, and will only be let out after the opening day of the tournament. Read more Share on Messenger Pinterest Europelast_img read more

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Joe Cokanasiga scores debut try to help spare England’s blushes against Japan

first_imgJones predicted Japan would be smashed and advised his former charges to seek sanctuary in a temple. It was not so much hubris as an attempt to jolt his players before a match when, unlike the previous weeks against the All Blacks and South Africa, they would be expected to take the initiative. Any satisfaction that the head coach took in the second-half revival was tempered by it needing an interval lecture and the early deployment of Owen Farrell to turn a game that largely passed the home side by in the opening period.Jones has long yearned for his players to be able to problem-solve without recourse to the coaching team, but coming from the tactical orthodoxy of the Premiership they are comfortable with the familiar. If Japan scored their two tries during the 10 minutes Jamie George was in the sin-bin for killing the ball at a ruck and paying for his side’s accumulation of offences, they were a final pass away from another three.Such was Japan’s domination of the first half that their interval lead of 15-10 made better reading for England, yet that came after Danny Care’s try on three minutes had suggested an afternoon stroll for England. The score was stunningly simple, Elliot Daly evading two tacklers after fielding a kick on his 10-metre line before Joe Cokanasiga and George combined to free the scrum-half.Yet Japan enjoyed 77% of the territory in the half and 69% of possession, with England lacking a foundation, having only one scrum and one lineout. When Chris Ashton limped off with a calf strain after 32 minutes, he had received only one pass. Autumn internationals England rugby union team Share on Facebook Facebook match reports Pinterest Maro Itoje breaks through three Japan tackles on one rampaging run. Photograph: Tom Jenkins/Guardian Japan rugby union team … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Support The Guardian Share on Twitter Eddie Jones promised his side would smash Japan but England were more toothless than ruthless for the first 50 minutes against resourceful and cunning opponents who revelled in broken play and were durable in contact. There was far less for the hosts to harvest from victory than there had been in defeat to New Zealand the week before, forced to go back to basics against tier two opponents after trailing at the interval. Rugby union Share on Messenger Read morecenter_img Wales’ Liam Williams helps turn scramble into a frolic against Tonga The Observer Share via Email Share on WhatsApp Read more Since you’re here… Share on LinkedIn Share on Pinterest Eddie Jones: ‘In the second half we finally got stuck in – that’s pleasing’ Japan’s two tries were contrasting but well executed. First, after Yu Tamura had kicked a penalty, Fumiaki Tanaka’s long, swift pass from a scrum allowed the centre Ryoto Nakamura to take on Alex Lozowski on the outside and break his opposite number’s tackle. Lozowski was to make a crucial tackle on Leitch two minutes before the break to prevent a try but Japan’s captain had already scored one after Akihito Yamada had freed his arms having been apparently wrapped up by two tacklers and set the flanker away on the right wing.Leitch has the physique of a second-row but the nimble-footedness of a Phil Bennett. He took the ball standing still, swatted away Danny Care, stepped out of Dylan Hartley’s challenge and, by now into his stride, surged through Harry Williams before dodging Daly to reach the line. But as the match progressed and tiredness became a factor, Japan started to drop kicks, pass loosely and give away penalties, allowing England, powered from the bench by Kyle Sinckler and Sam Underhill, to make inroads.Japan achieved a victory of sorts when Daly took a penalty from two metres inside his own half after Japan’s first try and George Ford kicked two after 55 and 63 minutes. Ford had set up Mark Wilson to regain the lead just before the hour-mark. As Japan chased the game, they reached breaking point.Cokanasiga scored a try on his debut after Richard Wigglesworth’s box-kick was dropped by William Tupou and when Japan lost the ball and were penalised, England kicked to touch and drove a maul for Hartley to score. Jack Nowell missed out late on when his kick went dead after another error as Japan kept going but without the energy of before.Japan had led at the interval on their only previous visit to Twickenham, for an uncapped match in 1986, only to lose after failing to score a point in the second period. There the similarities end. The World Cup hosts are now bulkier, smarter and better prepared. They simply need more fixtures like this one; and so do England. Twitter Their attempts to slow down Japan at the breakdown failed because a tactic turned into desperation as their opponents found a variety of ways to sustain moves: passes made under legs, over the head and out of the back of the hand. At times they went low with the clear-out, strong and quick; at others they were more upright, able to free their arms to find a support runner and they dealt with a rush defence by looping round the ball-carrier to provide an outlet.It meant Japan were able to play at their own pace before the interval and as England conceded penalties – the count was 8-1 against them before the break – they found themselves stuck in their own half. Japan at one point opted for a scrum rather than kick a penalty in front of the posts, and they three times kicked a penalty to touch and were not afraid to throw long to maximise their attacking options.Their pack may have lacked experience, with their captain, Michael Leitch, having 57 of the 124 caps, but they conceded little in terms of weight and they were robust in contact. What they lacked ultimately was a bench comparable to England’s and sufficient experience at the highest level to survive the final quarter when stressed by physical and mental fatigue. As they made mistakes and gave away penalties their light went out but it had burned brightly. Topics Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Fitness tips: how to overcome your workout fears

first_imgTopics … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Health & wellbeing When fear kicks in Your internal voice may verbalise your worst fears, causing your body to freeze in panic (“I’m going to fall!”) First: breathe. This slows the heart rate and calms body and mind. Next, talk to that internal voice to reassure it. Address your fears and affirm your safety. Remind yourself what you can do: you are not that far off the ground; you can do this; you have done it before; many others have managed it, and you can, too. And remember, you wanted to do this activity for a reason, so switch your mind from fear to fun.Everyday confidence Train your mind to support you. I start my day in bed imagining the day ahead going the best it could. Do this regularly and you will notice the difference.• Kamran Bedi’s book Your Mind Is Your Home is out now Before you go to the gym In anticipation of doing something that scares you, visualise the best-case outcome. Spend some time picturing yourself (looking through your own eyes) going through the whole activity – eg entering a gym, approaching a climbing wall, going to the top and then getting down again safely. Run through that positive representation a few times. Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Pinterest Reuse this content Since you’re here… Share on Messengercenter_img Read more Share via Email Share on Twitter Support The Guardian Fitness tips: AcroYoga for beginners features Share on WhatsApp Fitness tips Fitnesslast_img read more

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Ramos: Bayern’s Tillman ready to join U.S. U-20 team

first_imgUnited States Ramos: Bayern’s Timothy Tillman ready to join U.S. U-20 team Ives Galarcep @soccerbyives Last updated 1 year ago 01:17 1/12/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(1) Timothy Tillman Bayern 07092017 Sebastian Widmann United States Bayern München United States U20 After turning down the U.S. to attend a German U-18 camp in 2016, the 19-year-old appears ready to join up with the American program BRADENTON, Fla. — U.S. national team fans could use some good news on the dual-national front following Jonathan Gonzalez’s decision to play for Mexico, and it appears set to come from a German-American.U.S. Under-20 national team coach Tab Ramos has confirmed to Goal that Bayern Munich prospect Timothy Tillman is ready to join up with the U.S. U-20 team for a training camp in March.”He would have been with us here (in Florida at U.S. Soccer’s youth summit camp) but he was injured,” Ramos said. “He told me he’s ready to go and ready to join us and I’m excited to have him in the group because we haven’t had him in before.” Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Tillman made headlines a year ago when he was reportedly the subject of an attempted swoop by Barcelona. The son of a German-American serviceman, Tillman has a U.S. passport, and has represented Germany on the youth level with teams ranging from the U-15 to U-19 ranks.Tillman most recently played for Germany in U-19 Euro qualifying in October, making appearances against Belarus and Poland. Due to those appearances, Twillman would have to file a change of association with FIFA in order to play for the U.S. in any match. A change of association would tie him to the U.S. permanently.It remains unclear whether Tillman has submitted paperwork to file a change of association. Tillman could attend the U.S. U-20 camp in March without filing a change of association, but he would be prevented from appearing in any matches without filling a one-time switch.Eligible for the 2019 U-20 World Cup cycle, the 19-year-old is an 6-foot right winger who would provide competition in an attack already set to feature the likes of Nick Taitague, Jonathan Amon, Timothy Weah and Ayo Akinola.If Tillman eventually switches from the German setup to the U.S., he wouldn’t be the first player with American eligibility to do so. Fabian Johnson was a regular on the German U-21 national team, which won a European championship, before eventually choosing to play for the U.S.Jermaine Jones played for Germany’s senior team in a handful of friendlies before also making the switch. Johnson and Jones went on to play for the U.S. in the 2014 World Cup.Tillman’s younger brother Malik, 15, has played in the U.S. youth national team setup. A Bayern Munich youth player like his brother, Malik played for the U.S. U-15 national team at a friendly tournament in Croatia in 2016.A pair of Bayern Munich academy players took part in the recent U.S. youth soccer summit, with Justin Butler and Jalen Hawkins playing with the U.S. U-18 team.last_img read more

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